Ben Crider

Ben Crider

Ben Crider

Assistant Professor

244 Hilbun Hall
Mississippi State, MS 39762


Education

  • B.S., Physics, Mathematics: 2002 – 2006, University of Richmond
  • M.S., Physics: 2006 – 2009, University of Kentucky
  • Ph.D., Physics: 2009 – 2014, University of Kentucky
  • Research Associate, Nuclear Science and Security Consortium Postdoctoral Fellow: 2014 – 2017, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

Research Interests

My research focuses on experimentally studying the structure of atomic nuclei with large (or small) proton-to-neutron ratios. These so-called “exotic” nuclei often display many unexpected properties such as changes to the nuclear shape and excitation energy patterns when compared to the trends seen in their stable counterparts. These changes are due to the evolution of the single-particle level configurations as more nucleons are added to the nuclear system and result in specific observables that can be probed via decay spectroscopy. Exotic nuclei exist for a short amount of time before decaying, offering some advantages for determining their properties such as the ability to employ detection/analysis techniques to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of our measurements.  However, an obvious disadvantage is the difficulty in producing these exotic nuclei for study. In order to study the structure of exotic nuclei, my research program is currently focused on performing experiments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Using decay spectroscopy and a variety of radiation detection systems, we can measure the lifetimes of the excited nuclear states of exotic nuclei produced at NSCL. These lifetimes are directly related to the transition probabilities between the states, which provide sensitive information about any anomalies in the structure and stringent tests on the predictions made by theoretical models.